Toward Circularity in the Supply Chain

December 04, 2019 - 8:00AM
December 04, 2019 - 4:30PM
circularity roundtable

Register   |   Agenda   |   Map

Recycling systems around the world have been have been disrupted following China’s 2018 ban on the import of plastic waste. However, what has arguably created a global waste crisis can also be seen as an opportunity to re-invent inefficient or ineffective systems that generate unhandled waste streams, with the potential to advance society towards broader goals of waste reduction. Companies from every sector face this challenge, creating a unique opportunity to develop shared, collaborative solutions that rethink what it means to reduce, reuse, and recycle in the context of Industry 4.0 and the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals.

In this dynamic roundtable, industry professionals will come together under Chatham House rules to discuss the challenges that must be addressed if companies are to move from classic linear to circular supply chains. Circular supply chain management has been defined as the integration of circular thinking into the management of the supply chain. A primary goal is to realize a zero-waste vision, through system-wide innovation in business models and supply chain functions from product/service design to end-of-life and waste management, involving all relevant stakeholders.

The roundtable will be divided into five segments: managing product end of life, business and government ecosystem, the role of ecommerce, a solutions brainstorming, and the future of circular supply chains. For each segment, a roundtable facilitator supported by a moderator will stimulate discussion by bringing insights and learnings from real-world experiences and projects to the table. Participants will have the opportunity to network with their peers and gain ideas for embedding circular approaches in their supply chains.

***This MIT CTL Roundtable is exclusively for members of the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange and invited guests. If you are not a member of the Exchange and are interested in attending this roundtable as a potential SCE member, please contact ctl-events@mit.edu.

Register here:

*|MC:SUBJECT|*












MIT Alumni:  
MIT Alumni Program:  

Class Year:  

CTL Partner:  

For your event name tags and table cards.
First Name:

Last Name:

Company:


 

MISI - Data Management: Preparing for Machine Learning

November 13, 2019 - 8:00AM
November 13, 2019 - 5:00PM

Register on MISI's event page

Data fuels machine learning. Without timely, accurate data, machine learning models do not perform well and can give results that are misleading or fail to deliver value. It is vitally important that companies source and prepare data in the right manner - even though the process can require a vast amount of preparatory work and specialist expertise that may appear daunting. Companies should not even consider embarking on a machine learning project before completing this process.

***Open only to Supply Chain Exchange members and invited guests.

Flyer with dates and locations of rountables

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this roundtable, participants will explore the challenges of acquiring the right data as well as the work needed to turn data into the fuel that will run machine learning models efficiently. We aim to address these questions among others. 

  • How do you collect the right data?
  • How do you visualize data?
  • How do you prepare the data for analysis?
  • How do you make decisions about the governance and structure of data?

***This MIT CTL Roundtable is exclusively for members of the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange and invited guests. If you are not a member of the Exchange and are interested in attending this roundtable, please reach us at ctl-events@mit.edu.  

MIT - Data Management: Preparing for Machine Learning

October 15, 2019 - 8:00AM
October 16, 2019 - 2:30PM

MIT Campus

Register

Data fuels machine learning. Without timely, accurate data, machine learning models do not perform well and can give results that are misleading or fail to deliver value. It is vitally important that companies source and prepare data in the right manner - even though the process can require a vast amount of preparatory work and specialist expertise that may appear daunting. Companies should not even consider embarking on a machine learning project before completing this process.

***This MIT CTL Roundtable is exclusively for members of the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange and invited guests. If you are not a member of the Exchange and are interested in attending this roundtable as a potential SCE member, please contact ctl-events@mit.edu.

Flyer with dates and locations of rountables

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this roundtable, participants will explore the challenges of acquiring the right data as well as the work needed to turn data into the fuel that will run machine learning models efficiently. We aim to address these questions among others. 

  • How do you collect the right data?
  • How do you visualize data?
  • How do you prepare the data for analysis?
  • How do you make decisions about the governance and structure of data?

***This MIT CTL Roundtable is exclusively for members of the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange and invited guests. If you are not a member of the Exchange and are interested in attending this roundtable as a potential SCE member, please contact ctl-events@mit.edu.

Agenda  |  Map  |  FAQ

Agenda:

Tuesday, October 15
   8:30 Registration Check-In
   9:00 Welcome and Introductions
   9:30 Session I: Importance of Data
 10:30 Break
 11:00 Session II: Future State Data Governance Structures and Policies
 12:00 Lunch
   1:00 Session III: Managing Transformation and Change through Use-Case-Based Prioritization
   2:00 Break
   2:30  Session IV: Collecting the Right Data
   3:00 Break
   4:00 Closing: Key Take-Aways Day 1
   5:00 Informal Reception at Champions Restaurant, Cambridge Marriott
Wednesday, October 16
   8:30 Recap of Day 1
   9:00 Session V: Understanding Your Data & Data Wrangling
 10:30 Break
 11:00 Session VI: Data Visualization
 12:00 Lunch
   1:00 Computational and Visual Education (CAVE) Lab Session
   1:30 Closing: Key Take-Aways from Day 2
   2:30 Adjourn

*|MC:SUBJECT|*












MIT Alumni:  
MIT Alumni Program:  

Class Year:  

CTL Partner:  

For your event name tags and table cards.
First Name:

Last Name:

Company:


 

Annual Partner Meeting 2019

April 24, 2019 - 8:30AM
April 24, 2019 - 5:00PM

MIT E40 3rd Floor, Cambridge, USA

Register

On Wednesday, April 24, 2019, the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics (MIT CTL) and members from the 50+ Partner companies that belong to the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange will convene. The intention of this Annual Partner Meeting is to provide our Partners with an update on the latest research and development activities at MIT CTL, and to solicit input from Supply Chain Exchange Partners on future plans for the Center.

This meeting coincides with our Annual Crossroads Conference being held the prior day, on Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Crossroads is a one-day event that brings together experts from MIT, the world’s foremost center for technological innovation, and the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics (MIT CTL), the global leader in supply chain education and research, to offer a truly unique learning opportunity. Crossroads is where you will discover how emerging innovations intersect with supply chain management (SCM). Learn More and Register for Crossroads 2019 Please note, the registration fee is waived for Supply Chain Exchange Partners and their guests. 

Annual Partner Meeting FAQ | Annual Partner Meeting Agenda

PLEASE NOTE: The MIT campus in the Kendall Square area is undergoing a major renovation/construction.




Name Tag First Name:
Name Tag Last Name:
Name Tag Company:









MIT Alumni Program:
Class Year:
How did you hear about this event?

Colleague Referral:
CTL Website:
I am a CTL Partner:
LinkedIn:
Email Newsletter:
Specify Other
I was referred by:

Annual Partner Meeting 2018

April 18, 2018 - 8:30AM
April 18, 2018 - 5:00PM

MIT Media Lab - 75 Amherst St., Bldg E14- 6th floor

Register | Agenda | FAQ

PLEASE NOTE: The MIT campus in the Kendall Square area is undergoing a major renovation/construction.

____________________________________

On Wednesday, April 18, 2018, the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics (MIT CTL) and members from the 50+ Partner companies that belong to the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange will convene. The intention of this Annual Partner Meeting is to provide our Partners with an update on the latest research and development activities at MIT CTL, and allow us to solicit input from our Partners on future plans for the Center.

This meeting coincides with our Annual Crossroads Conference being held the prior day, on Tuesday, April 17, 2018.  (Click the below menu to learn more about, and register for Crossroads 2018.)

Don't miss out on the opportunity to exchange ideas and learn about our plans for the coming year.

Innovations in Transportation Roundtable: Disrupting the Dominant Design of Procurement and Management

February 12, 2019 - 12:00PM
February 13, 2019 - 12:30PM

This MIT CTL Roundtable is exclusively for members of the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange and invited guests. If you are not a member of the Supply Chain Exchange and are interested in attending this roundtable, please reach out to CTL Events at <ctl-events@mit.edu>. 

Location: MIT's Samberg Conference Center, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, MA 02142

Registration for this Roundtable has closed. If you have any questions about joining, please contact ctl-events@mit.edu.

AgendaFAQ  |  Visiting MIT  |  Where is E52 Samberg Conference Center?

The United States truckload transportation market has been a roller coaster ride over the last eighteen months. Whether due to labor shortages, increased demand, more restrictive regulations, or other reasons, truckload capacity has been at its tightest point in decades.  The primary outcome of this tightness has been an increase in transportation costs for shippers across industry as well as a degradation in level of service. 

One potential contributing factor to these recent challenges that has not received as much attention is the dominant freight procurement methodology.  The process of procuring freight transportation in North America has not changed in over 20 years.  Despite the presence of dozens of highly visible tech startups in this space, the vast majority of shippers and carriers still practice the same methods, use the same technologies, and rely on the same form of contractual arrangements as they did in the previous century. 

The hallmarks of this traditional process are:

  • Annual (or bi-annual) reverse auctions of individual lanes with averaged volume levels to a large set of incumbent and new carriers,
  • A sophisticated (and typically months long) carrier to lane assignment process using an optimization engine to minimize the expected costs while adhering to level of service and business constraints,
  • Awarding static annual contracts to selected carriers that specify a static rate to be charged the entire year but does not bind the shipper to produce volume on the auctioned lanes nor the carrier to cover 100% of the loads on the lanes they “won,” and finally,
  • Populating the shipper’s routing guide within their Transportation Management System to be accessed throughout the duration of the contract when a shipment materializes. 

This Carrier Bid Optimization process was very innovative when it was introduced in the mid-1990s.  It served the industry quite well after deregulation of the trucking market in the 1980’s.  Prior to this, carriers were restricted in the number of shippers they could contract with, all rates were published and submitted to the ICC, and there was very little competition on lanes between carriers.  In the decade following deregulation, shippers struggled to determine the “market price” for truckload services on the thousands of lanes that they operated over.  Auctions, or to be more precise, reverse auctions were the perfect tools to efficiently discover market prices in these perfectly competitive markets.  The methodology fit the times. 

The situation today, however, has changed.  New technologies, shifting market conditions, faster communication, and an overall dislike of the current practices by all involved players is leading towards a potential disruption of this dominant design.  Any substantial redesign of the freight transportation procurement process will need to involve:

  • Changes to both shipper and carrier business processes,
  • Introduction and use of new technologies and analytical methods (software, communication, visualization, and hardware), and
  • Modifications to legal contracts and relationships between carriers, drivers, shippers, and 3rd parties. 

These three threads (process, technology, and contracts) are intertwined and should not be addressed in isolation.  For example, changing procurement to include fixed carrier volume assignments requires contracts that enforce “take or pay” conditions.  Similarly, establishing evergreen contracts with rates based on a mutually agreed upon index requires a sophisticated indexing and forecasting algorithms. 

The goal of this roundtable is to explore and better understand the current and possible future state of art and practice in freight transportation procurement and management.  Participants in the roundtable will include representatives from shippers, carriers, brokers, third parties, technology providers, and other stakeholder groups.  It promises to be an interesting and exciting event! 

AgendaFAQ

Women in Supply Chain Summit: Achieving Balance in SCM

March 26, 2019 - 11:30AM
March 27, 2019 - 12:30PM

This event is exclusively for members of the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange and invited guests.
Registration has closed as we have reached capacity for this event. 

Location: Converse, 1 Lovejoy Wharf, Boston, MA
Agenda
For more information please contact Katie Date

Why women in supply chain?

Engineering and Supply Chain Management have traditionally been male-dominated fields. This is slowly changing. According to the "2018 Women in Supply Chain Survey" by Gartner, the average percentage of women in Supply Chain roles has increased from 35% to 37% over a three-year period from 2016-2018.

The goal of this roundtable is to bring the Supply Chain community together to share in the insights, experiences and knowledge of inspiring women who are leaders in their industries and in their supply chain roles. Through the sharing of these lessons and experiences, we will develop best practices that ensure continued growth in attracting and retaining talented women into the Supply Chain field. 

FAQ | Agenda

MIT Women Supply Chain Summit

 

To learn more contact Katie Date

Future of Retail

November 14, 2018 - 8:00AM
November 15, 2018 - 12:00PM

This MIT CTL Roundtable is exclusively for members of the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange and invited guests. If you are not a member of the Supply Chain Exchange and are interested in attending this roundtable, please reach out to Katie Date at <datecl@mit.edu>. 

Location: MIT E40-356 (SCM Lab)

RegisterFAQ | Agenda

Many Factors Affecting Retail Operations

Across the globe, data show that retailers have been changing rapidly due to multiple factors. First, high population densities in urban areas limit the areas in which large retailers can be built, forcing market players to open small, easily accessible retail stores. This, in turn, causes the fragmentation of urban distribution networks, leading to frequent deliveries in smaller volumes and increased logistics costs. In addition, the evolution of the retail footprint depends on diverse consumer socioeconomic backgrounds and profiles, and other trends. These factors should be used to design tailored logistics strategies, high-performance retail operations, and collaborative supply chains. This strategy will couple the dynamic retail environment and help stakeholders achieve a long-term competitive advantage.

MIT SCALE Network Roundtable

The MIT Global SCALE Network is committed to addressing the economic and social impacts of the ever-changing retail landscape. Given this existing and growing dynamism in the retail industry, the objective of this roundtable is to bring together key stakeholders (i.e., suppliers, logistics service providers, manufacturers, and consumers) to better understand the challenges considering global perspectives from across the SCALE Network. In addition, we will discuss the best way to generate productive supply chain solutions across various stakeholders considering operations of diverse retailers, going from the big-box chained retailers to the nano-stores. 

The future of retail will be driven by multiple trends such as technology, demographics, macro- and microeconomics. On the one hand, this future will be related to the way in which each stakeholder shapes his/her role, operations and collaborative schemes into the retail-based supply chains to improve the performance of the whole value chain. On the other hand, this future will be linked to how consumer profiles, preferences are coupled with the retail landscape and the way in which all retailers adopt and adapt their logistics strategies (e.g., replenishment, transportation, procurement) to changing market conditions (such as the entry or exit of a competitor and the evolution of consumer features). 

In addition, practitioners need to address a number of more specific issues such as: 

  • Designing high-performance in-store and retail supply chain operations to guarantee availability and the optimal mix of products per geographic region 
  • Understanding core drivers of consumer profiles and retailer features in fiercely competed markets 
  • Analyzing the evolution of purchasing patterns in the SC stakeholders and the dynamic retail market 
  • Developing the best combination of inbound transportation and delivery alternatives to retailers and end consumers 
  • Fostering synchronization and building collaborative schemes for the retail industry 
  • Driving the most effective technologies and enablers from digital transformation into the retail industry 
  • Building the capability to collect, analyze reliable data to improve supply chain decision making in the retail industry 
  • Facing the main challenges in implementing an omnichannel strategy in retail supply chains.

Roundtable Six Key Topics: 

  1. Retail operations and supply chains 
  2. Diversification and competition in the retail footprint 
  3. Coupling the dynamic consumer behaviors and the evolving retail SCs 
  4. Transportation and delivery strategies in retail 
  5. Digital transformation and collaboration in retail 
  6. E-commerce and omnichannel strategies in retail SCs

The target audience for this roundtable includes supply chain professionals, large global retailers, food chains, CPG manufacturers, multi-stakeholder groups, logistics-service and technology providers, retail federations and associations, and governmental-related institutions 

This MIT CTL Roundtable is for members of the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange and special guests. If you are not a member of the Supply Chain Exchange and are interested in attending this roundtable please reach out to Katie Date datecl@mit.edu. 

MIT CTL roundtables are highly interactive events where participants learn from each other. There are no PowerPoint presentations and attendance numbers are carefully managed – the emphasis is on generating a rich discourse in an open environment.

RegisterFAQ | Agenda

Image from previous MIT CTL Roundtable.

AI/Machine Learning in Supply Chain Planning: Current Applications, Future Possibilities

November 27, 2018 - 11:30AM
November 28, 2018 - 5:00PM

This MIT CTL Roundtable is exclusively for members of the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange and invited guests. If you are not a member of the Supply Chain Exchange and are interested in attending this roundtable, please reach out to Katie Date at <datecl@mit.edu>. 

Location:
Tuesday, 11/27/18: MIT Samberg Conference Center, 50 Memorial Drive, 6th floor (Building E52)
Wednesday, 11/28/18: MIT E40-356 (SCM Lab)

Register | AgendaFAQ

Companies are awash in data, and fast-evolving analytics using Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) technologies can turn this mass of data into actionable information that ultimately increases competitiveness.

But feedback from industry practitioners suggests that while these advances are being harnessed in the supply chain domain, there is a need for more education on AI/ML methods as well as opportunities to explore their potential for solving key supply chain problems. 

The MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics (MIT CTL) Supply Chain Exchange will address these knowledge gaps in a 1 ½-day event at the MIT campus, Cambridge, MA, on November 27-28, 2018.

Building on past roundtable discussions on supply chain analytics, the event in November 2018 will focus on the use of AI/ML in supply chain planning. The discussions will center on specific AI/ML applications in forecasting, demand planning, operations planning and supply chain design.

The event will kick off with a half-day primer on AI/ML technology, that will include examples of applications in logistics, transportation and supply chain management generally. This will be followed by a one-day roundtable, during which attendees will discuss emerging applications of AI/ML in supply chain planning within the areas explored during the initial primer session. Attendees also will share their experiences of applying AI/ML technology.

MIT CTL roundtables are highly interactive events where participants learn from each other. There are no PowerPoint presentations and attendance numbers are carefully managed – the emphasis is on generating a rich discourse in an open environment.

Register | AgendaFAQ

Blockchain Applications in Supply Chain Management

October 09, 2018 - 11:30AM
October 10, 2018 - 5:00PM

This MIT CTL Roundtable is exclusively for members of the MIT CTL Supply Chain Exchange and invited guests. If you are not a member of the Supply Chain Exchange and are interested in attending this roundtable, please reach out to Katie Date at <datecl@mit.edu>.  

Location: MIT E40-356 (SCM Lab)

AgendaFAQ | Map

Registration for this event has been closed.

Last October the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics (MIT CTL) convened approximately 50 supply chain practitioners and researchers in a roundtable event to assess the potential of blockchain or distributed ledger technology – an innovation that was the subject of much hype but which relatively few professionals in the industry understood. The discussions identified a number of potential supply chain applications as well as challenges in the adoption of blockchain.

Nearly one year later, supply chain practitioners have gained a better understanding of blockchain’s potential, and a number of applications are in advanced stages of development.

However, the technology and its use remains widely misunderstood. And while there are emerging applications, adoption seems to be slower than anticipated and there continues to be much skepticism about blockchain’s viability in complex supply chain environments and when data/information is unreliable.

Against this background, MIT CTL will convene a second blockchain roundtable for supply chain practitioners on October 9-10 2018. The day-and-a-half event will take place on the MIT campus.

This invitation-only MIT CTL Roundtable will comprise a half-day workshop to explain blockchain and develop a common understanding of the technology, followed by a full-day roundtable session to examine the most promising applications in the supply chain domain.  As we did last year, attendees also will explore the benefits that blockchains might deliver, and how the technology could be applied today and in the future. Experts involved in real world blockchain projects will stimulate the discussions with brief accounts of their experiences to date.  Additionally, researchers from the CTL Blockchain working group will share learnings from recent and ongoing interactions and data collection.

MIT CTL roundtables are highly interactive events where participants learn from each other. There are no PowerPoint presentations and attendance numbers are carefully managed – the emphasis is on generating a rich discourse in an open environment.

FAQ | Agenda