March 15, 2017 - 11:00AM
March 15, 2017 - 12:00PM

Online

Join the Webinar Here

Cyber attacks on supply chains are a constant threat to organizations. News media are regularly reporting cyber attacks to supply chains that result in data theft or denial of service. Examples abound, such as the theft of credit card data for 70 million customers from Target in 2013, and a sophisticated distributed attack that blocked the websites of major companies in the east-US such as Amazon, Starbucks and PayPal, during most the 21st of October 2016.

Although relevant, this coverage often overshadows cyber-attacks that affect supply chain operations, which continue to occur without media attention. This is giving hackers free range to refine and practice their techniques for increased penetration and damage, resulting in a whole different range of disruptions such as container theft, intervention of plant operation, or misallocation of payments, for example.  

The MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics (CTL) will host a webinar to address hacker-related vulnerabilities in supply chain operations. 

At the root of this problem lies the structure of data exchanges between supply chain partners. Key questions for supply chain managers include:

  • How does your supply chain manage these data exchanges?
  • How much are you assigning these problems to IT even though they have direct impact on operations?
  • How does your supply chain prevent these attacks, or react when these attacks happen?
  • Is your supply chain merely relying on external insurance, or do you understand how these exchanges can be designed and controlled in cases of attack for improved recovery?  

Dr. Jim Rice and Daniel Sepulveda, PhD student, will address these questions, and talk about research findings that offer a deeper understanding of the structures that supply chains can use to improve their response from hacker attacks so as to minimize operational disruption and allow a more efficient recovery.

Register Here | Join the Webinar Here

For more information, contact Daniel Sepulveda at dasep@mit.edu.

Visit our Project page at MIT-CTL